Commemorating WWI in West Australia

In 1914 at Blackboy Hill training camp,  young men went to bed impatient to be off to the war. . They had gathered from around West Australia and trained for 10 weeks volunteering  for WWI and they had grown tired of all the drills.

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After a parade at 4am on October 31 the young men of the 11th Infantry Battalion, the first to be raised in West Australia , got the news they had been waiting for. The troopships Medic and Ascanius were in port in Fremantle, waiting to take them to join the Australian convoy from Albany. 

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Many wouldn't see their home and soil again, as they set out for a war from which they would never return. Their sacrifice is still remembered. Retracing the steps of the soldiers seems to be  a sobering reminder. 

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Members of the 11th Battalion Living History Unit, with period uniforms and rifles commemorated the event. They brought as well real and replica objects, such as jam tin bombs, bayonets and rum jars, to help educate the crowd about life in the camp and on the front line. Their goal is and was to personalise the sacrifice of the soldiers, especially the often overshadowed 11th Battalion. They took a special heritage train from Midland to Fremantle, where they took part in a commemorative parade and a wreath-laying ceremony.

 

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